Joan Liman’s Story

Some people seem to have it all—going through life with luck on their side, having good things seemingly come to them without effort. Most of us don’t have it that easy, of course, but neither do we have to deal with major obstacles at a young age, only to have more problems pile on top of those. Joan Liman has had to deal with mental and physical illnesses simultaneously. She’s had marital problems. She lost a job. But one word that isn’t in her vocabulary is “insurmountable.” Not only did she make it through medical school, she found a creative outlet for expressing her life’s dramatic challenges via the magic of theater. As Joan relates her story, one can’t help but hear the hope and humor through all of the layers of turmoil. Although for much of her life, she has been arm wrestling with life’s challenges, Joan explains how, through perseverance, attitude and humor, she was able to gain the upper hand and deal with things that might have devastated mere mortals.

“I was 26 when I had my first battle with depression. I was hospitalized. Depression ran in my family. I had my ECT—electro-convulsive therapy—in 1977. It worked. I had recovered from my depression, but I wasn’t really happy being just a stay-at-home housewife and mother—doing laundry, and that kind of thing. So I decided to apply to medical school. I was accepted. I had been pre-med in college, but I abandoned it when my daughter was born. I loved medical school. I really felt I had found my niche.

At the end of my second year, I was diagnosed with lymphoma. It was stage four, which meant it had spread. I was given two years to live. I developed depression again at the end of my third year of medical school. People told me, “You have cancer—of course you’re going to be depressed.” But it was more than that—the deep depression had returned. My marriage was on shaky ground. Not only did my husband have to deal with a wife with a mental disease but now also a very serious physical illness. So I had fallen into a very serious depression. This time, I was hospitalized for four weeks in a residential facility. I had taken a leave of my medical residency when that happened. I figured my marriage was going to fall apart, and I knew the courts weren’t so kind to people with mental illness back then. I wasn’t even sure I could return to my residency. At this point, I was a non-practicing physician.

The depression episode was kind of an “aha” moment for me. I decided I was going to keep my family together and was very fortunate to find a position in medical school administration. I joked that I used to feel like a Jewish mother who had 500 kids. People there were going through all sorts of things I had gone through, like depression and cancer. It was a 9-to-5 kind of job, as opposed to the hours I would have had to work as a doctor.

I defied the odds with my lymphoma—everything was great. Then, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. On top of that, a new dean came in to the medical school where I worked. They wound up letting a lot of people go—and I was one of them. I got a severance package from the school, which I really had to fight for. I went through chemo and had a double mastectomy. I suffered from another phase of depression, but it was nothing like before. At this point, I had been on an effective antidepressant for a number of years.

I realized after being laid off that being involved in theater was something I could put my energy into. I heard an interview on NPR about this small theater I had never heard of. This theater company celebrated the minority perspective. It really appealed to me because I came of age in the sixties, during the civil rights movement. At the end of the radio interview, they said they needed volunteers. I decided to volunteer for the theater, and ended up taking a course in producing—and I began to produce plays.

Someone once told me, “You have had such an interesting life—you should really write a book about it.” I’ve always wanted to write, but if I wanted to write at all it would be a play because I love theater, and it would be a musical because I love musicals. So I came up with “A Limanade Life,” which is a play on words of the old expression, “If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” Well, my name is Liman, so it makes Limanade! Basically, the play tells in song and narrative what I just told you. It’s been performed mainly for fundraisers for The American Cancer Society. I’ve also had it performed in a theater festival, where I was a semi-finalist; and I just submitted it to another theater festival. It’s opening up there at the end of August. It was one of ten plays chosen, and it’s the only musical. Hopefully, it will keep having a life of its own.

I’m a two-time cancer-survivor. I’ve been depression-free and mania-free for 20 years. My mantra is that when tragedy strikes, don’t be defined by it—find the divine in it. I’m a person who happens to have cancer—it doesn’t define who I am. My career path took so many twists and turns. No one knows why bad things happen to good people. The question is what happens after bad things happen to good people? I have a good sense of humor. That’s what got me through it. The message of my play is that if you have obstacles, you can overcome them. I have, and you can too!”

Botanical Wisdom: Why Vitanova Uses Ginger.

Most of us have heard at least something about ginger, either as a spice or for our health, but most probably don’t know why or how we should be using it.

Ginger has been on record for more than 5,000 years and was one of the first recorded spices. Native to south Asia and brought to the Romans and Greeks by Arab traders, ginger was once considered a luxury costing the equivalent of an entire sheep in the Middle Ages. Belonging to the Zingiberaceae family (along with turmeric and cardamom), ginger (zingiber officinale) is best known as a spice used for adding a warming feeling to the stomach and a pungent taste to many food dishes, but it also has many medicinal uses and health benefits, as well.

In Ayurveda, ginger is used for a variety of health issues including stimulating digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid, relieving menstrual cramps, and for easing the pain of sprains or strains and increasing joint comfort and flexibility.* Chinese medicine recommends dried ginger to support respiratory health.* And, modern clinical research indicates that ginger is an excellent tonic for nausea, occasional indigestion, gas, and possibly even motion sickness.* Ginger is one of the most studied spices for improving health.*

Can a spice also help you lose weight? Ginger’s high fiber content means that foods ingested will be processed more efficiently and move through the gastrointestinal system and out of the body more quickly. In addition, ginger improves digestion by increasing the pH of the stomach, which can stimulate digestive enzymes. But, the big piece of ginger’s helpful weight loss properties lies in its ability to rev up the body’s burners resulting from its thermogenic effect. This increases metabolism, which translates to fat burning.

Not only is ginger a proven fat burner, it’s also effective for curbing the appetite. A study in the journal Metabolism from 2012 showed that giving study participants (men) a tea with 2 grams of dried ginger powder helped with feelings of satiety. The men were given ginger tea with breakfast on alternating days, and hunger was recorded hourly. The study showed that ginger had a significant effect on the feeling of hunger after eating.

Ginger comes in a variety of forms: tinctures, powders, whole rhizome (root), essential oils, pickled, and in supplement form (pills or capsules), and the FDA has registered the spice as GRAS (generally recognized as safe). Since it also has the ability to reduce blood platelet build-up as effectively as aspirin, speak with your doctor before adding ginger to your stable of natural remedies if you take medications for blood thinning or other maladies.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21849094

http://www.kew.org/science-conservation/plants-fungi/zingiber-officinale-ginger

Ginger Root In Ayurveda and Chinese Medicine

http://www.progressivehealth.com/ginger-for-weight-loss.htm

http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/id/ART00366

http://www.herballegacy.com/Whitney_History.html

http://www.metabolismjournal.com/article/S0026-0495(12)00118-7/fulltext

http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/ginger

http://www.kew.org/science-conservation/plants-fungi/zingiber-officinale-ginger

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4277626/

http://www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/foodadditivesingredients/ucm091048.htm

Living Healthier, Living Longer – Katie’s Story

Katie Doble is a 34-year-old staffing manager. Single and seemingly healthy, she was blindsided by a diagnosis of a rare cancer, ocular melanoma. Refusing to let the diagnosis define her, she learned she needed to be living a far healthier lifestyle if she was going to give cancer her best attack.

Katie sat down with me to tell me her story. ~ Story by Sandi Pearce

I had already been going to an ophthalmologist because of my poor vision. When I went in to see the doc again after noticing a slight loss of vision in my left eye, he noticed a bump on my retina and said he wanted to send me to a specialist. I went to the retina specialist that same morning.

On my way to the specialist, I called my sister, Julie, and told her there was something wrong with my eye. My dad was diagnosed with macular degeneration when he was my age, and my sister and I were both worried it might be that. Instead, I was diagnosed that day with ocular melanoma. I was completely blindsided by the diagnosis.

I called my sister crying—she was at her son’s field day at school—and told her I have cancer. She called my parents and other siblings to let them know the news, and then accompanied me to the afternoon appointment to find out  what my options were.

A week later, I had radiation treatment to my eyeball. They left the radiation plaque anchored to the back of my eye for one week and also biopsied the cells during the treatment. The cells came back as 1A, which meant that there was a 98% chance that it wouldn’t metastasize.

I experienced this euphoric state when I got the news that it was a 1A. I was suddenly a cancer survivor only a few weeks after diagnosis. I didn’t lose my hair, I didn’t have to go through chemo, and I didn’t miss any work. I was very grateful. I did lose my vision in that eye, and I’ve had to adjust to a different depth perception. I run into walls and I can’t catch anything to save my life, but that’s a small price to pay.  And then, it was just back to my normal, single life.

I met my husband, Nick, that fall of 2013, on LinkedIn. Weeks earlier, I had been on a date with a guy who said that my current situation wasn’t conducive to starting a romantic relationship, but if I wanted to call him when I was all better, we could hang out again. When I met Nick, I let him know what I’d recently been through, but it didn’t faze him at all. I knew right then that he was the one.

For a year after that, I had been getting routine ultrasounds. With ocular melanoma, if it’s going to metastasize, it will spread to the liver or lungs, so I had chest x-rays and liver ultrasounds every six months. After the first one, I got a voicemail from the clinic saying that everything was fine. Then, I had another checkup in November. While I was in a meeting with a client, my phone started blowing up with messages. By the time I got out to my car, I had two missed calls from the doctor’s office and a voicemail from the doctor saying I needed to call her back right away. You know it’s bad when the doctor calls. So, I called her back, and she asked if I was sitting down. My heart was racing. She said there was something suspicious on my liver. She said she didn’t know anything yet, but she wanted to biopsy it right away.

Nick followed through with his previous plan to propose to me on Thanksgiving Day, which just happened to be the day before my biopsy. My dad, a general physician, flew into town Thanksgiving morning to be there with me for my biopsy the following day, and Nick and my sisters also joined us.

When I was 15 years-old, my mom died of pancreatic cancer. She came to me in a dream a couple of years after she died and told me that whenever I saw a hot air balloon, I would know she’s with me. As I was rolling into the biopsy room with my dad at my side, I immediately started crying. My dad asked what was wrong, so I told him to look up. In the ceiling tile, there was a picture of a hot air balloon. I have seen more hot air balloons this year and last than I ever have before. Almost weekly I see one.

We found out for certain a week later that I have uveal melanoma.

After starting in a clinical trial in New York City, I decided to make a stronger effort to clean up my diet. So in the spring of 2015, I met with a nutritionist. She was operating under the assumption that I knew how to cook, which made it difficult to work with her because she would tell me to sauté something, but I had no idea what that meant! I had no cooking skills. All of my dishes involved bison or red meat because I’m from Nebraska. I needed someone to hold my hand and tell me what to do. The drug I was on caused me to become lactose intolerant, so I struggled to find things to eat that didn’t have dairy in them. By July and August, as a result of the drugs, I had no appetite at all. The only thing that I wanted to eat was french toast. It was such a painful thing because I was so hungry; yet, the thought of food was horrible. That’s the only time that I went off wine! I lost 30 pounds. I’m pretty petite, so that was a huge loss.

In August, I was forced to go off that trial because it was not working. We tried another trial in September that also failed. With the break in medications, I finally regained my appetite. From mid-October through the end of the year, I ate horribly. I was drinking milkshakes every day, eating donuts—you name it, I’d eat it. I was just trying to put weight back on. I was really struggling because I knew I needed to gain the weight back, but at the same time, I knew I wasn’t making healthy choices.

I spoke with one of my doctors about my eating habits, and he made me promise to call another doctor he recommended. He’s a general physician who specializes in nutrition. Up until this point, none of my doctors had talked with me about diet.

Dr. Ed, the nutrition doc, is also a cancer survivor. After practicing medicine for some time, he went back to study integrative medicine to combine Eastern and Western medicine. He talked about meditating and asked me where I see myself in 10 years and asked me to start to meditate about that. That’s something I do every day now. I picture being in Ireland with my husband and future family. That’s my happy place. He wanted me to put positive thoughts in my head instead of living in fear. I stopped doing things like thinking of songs for my funeral. It’s a lot easier to get through the day thinking happy, positive thoughts.

Dr. Ed gave me a homework assignment: read The China Study. That book gave me the science and facts I needed to start making healthier choices.  He also has me taking a number of supplements. I tell people who are wary of supplements, “I know that taking extra vitamin D or magnesium is not going to hurt me. It might not help me, but it’s certainly not going to hurt me.

Since I started taking the supplements and changed my diet, I have eaten very little red meat at all. You’re talking to the girl who used to eat meat three meals a day.  I don’t struggle as much with not eating meat as I do with no dairy.

Nick has been so supportive. He used to do most of the cooking, but now I do most of it, and I cook a lot of vegetables and salmon now. My doctor is 90% vegetarian, a plan I also adopted. Just eating 10% meat is helpful because I don’t feel as restricted.

I used to be in this huge struggle between my willpower and my food. I needed the doctor to explain the science behind it so my willpower could rise above my cravings. The China Study was the exact tool I needed to finally learn how to change and take this seriously. I don’t cut myself off from everything, but I make much better decisions now. It talks about the correlation between animal proteins and cancer, and dairy was a big piece of it, too. And, it’s in everything.

I have a habit that helps me. I use lists. I have a daily checklist. On it, it says: Meditate, fruits and veggies, juice, bedtime pills, dinner pills, lunch pills, breakfast pills and 30 minutes of exercise. In the beginning, I looked at that list every day so I wouldn’t forget anything. That’s something that really helped me mentally cope.

Someone else suggested this mantra: “I am healthy, I am young, I am light, I am love.” And I added, “I am surviving.” That’s one that I say when I drive to work or when I am rolling down that CT scan tube.

My advice to people is to take it one step at a time. Everyone just has to figure out their own go-tos to get through whatever they’re dealing with.

I have literally never felt this good before. I feel the healthiest I’ve ever felt. That gives me hope. This cancer can’t take me.

The Ride of My Life – Catherine Brubaker’s Story

Catherine Brubaker had what she thought was the perfect life—the relationship, the homes, the trips, the degrees, the money—until she and her (then) partner were attacked and she was left with a lifelong brain injury. But through permanent trauma came healing of the soul and a calling to help others to find their way out of the darkness of brain injury. 

The long and the short of it is, I thought I had a successful life. I was in the financial services industry, had a long-term relationship, and had two homes, two cars, a boat, dogs, toys. My partner and I were in great shape. I was on the ski team, downhill skiing. I was really enjoying life and was at the peak—or what I thought to be the peak of my life. And then it was all taken away from me in an instant. On a weekend away with my partner, we were drugged and assaulted and left for dead. From the blood loss of the attack, I was left with an anoxic brain injury (lack of oxygen to the brain). I had a lot of amnesia and extreme difficulty with everything. The medical response wasn’t what it should have been at the time because there was no bleeding in the brain on the scans. The blood was already gone from my brain since I had bled so much from the attack, so no one noticed the brain injury, and I was too confused to tell them anything accurately. But, they knew there was a problem. I had obvious issues with my heart rate. It was down to 38, and no one could explain why. I had a lot of confusion, and it was clear within three days that I had a big problem, but no one knew what that problem was. I was left to pick up the pieces of my life.

Now, instead of focusing on the attack, my focus is on my recovery. It’s been a big part of my journey of healing to let go of the assault. For a long time, I was stuck in the lack of justice. I had a lot of anger. When you have a brain injury and you lose everything, including your ability to walk, talk, shower, feed yourself, and other things, you get mad. After being competent and having a master’s degree and a high IQ…and then here I am…I’m stuck in a wheelchair. It’s a huge shock. I had to go through all of the stages of grief while I was in rehab. Events began to come back as the amnesia lifted.

During rehab, we started strength testing, and the testing revealed there were some serious issues. I wasn’t able to stand up. My blood pressure would bottom out, and I would pass out. I was diagnosed with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, POTs. It’s a part of the dysautonomia—my autonomic system isn’t working correctly. My brain doesn’t have clear communication with my body. Then, my heart failed, so I had to get a pacemaker. My blood pressure bottoms out easily. My temperature doesn’t regulate, so I constantly have to add and remove layers of clothing. My body doesn’t hold onto salts and electrolytes, which is an ongoing issue, and I go in and out of episodes.

Adding to the issues I already had, while on my way home from having a pacemaker implanted to regulate my heart, I was in a head-on collision as the front passenger. That gave me a second traumatic brain injury—post-concussive syndrome—and landed me back in the hospital. I was an inpatient for about a month and outpatient after that for another month or so and then in rehab after that. That was about a year and half after the original brain injury, around 2012.

I’ll be very candid. I don’t think I have the most intense strength. After the second injury, I bottomed out. I lost my relationship and had to live with my mother, who was not in the best health. My life was packed into boxes, and I slept on the couch. Then, one morning, I found my mother passed away. At that point, I wanted to give up, but I saw the result of where my life could go if I did give up, the trajectory of my life if I were just going to lie in bed and do nothing. I could see it before my eyes—like a choice in front of me. That motivated me.

I discovered adaptive cycling in rehab and found that my blood doesn’t pool in my abdomen and legs when my legs are horizontal. So, I went searching for the best thing for me—a trike. Discovering a trike wasn’t by design or by plan. It was purely by accident; I just couldn’t balance a regular bike. When I went to the local bike shop to look for a trike, I was picturing an old lady’s bike with a bell and a basket! I didn’t know what to expect. At a bike shop online, I found the coolest thing I’d ever seen. It looks like a Batmobile, and it’s the fastest trike made in America. It took a month or so to get it delivered because it was fitted specifically to my size.

The day I got my trike was the day I got my freedom back. It changed my life. First, I rode it around the block, and then a bit farther, and then I rode to my grandmother’s house—from Tempe to Chandler, Arizona—and back. Now, I ride to live and I live to ride, every day.

If I don’t ride my trike, I have challenges with my digestive system, my blood pressure—everything. So, by cycling, I am forcing my digestive system to work. I’m forcing my body to heal. Forcing my blood pressure to work and really trying to heal it naturally, despite taking a ton of medicine for the neurological effects. I had to find a healthy way to get control and not be a shut-in anymore. After having a full life and then suddenly going to live with my mother and having the most exciting thing be senior discount day with my mom, well, that’s a stark contrast. Here I am, a person who has her master’s in leadership, and I was playing video games with 19-year-olds. And here I was in my bedroom I was in when I was two years old. Cycling allowed me to go from being a shut-in to reclaiming my freedom.

That’s how I met Dan Zimmerman. Dan and I literally ran into each other on the bike path on our adaptive tricycles. He had suffered a stroke, so the right side of his body doesn’t function properly. When he spoke, his speech was delayed like mine. We had something in common—we were both coming back from tragedy—and we were complete strangers. Then, he showed me a card. On the back of this card was a plan to cycle across the United States. I wanted to do this! I saw this as my way to a different life.

 

When I rode across the country with Dan, we started as complete strangers and ended up with the most beautiful experience two human beings can have as survivors. We were 20 inches off the ground and in complete silence, reclaiming our lives and seeing the most beautiful parts of the country and meeting people of all walks of life. It’s not the impression you get of the U.S. that you get from seeing it on CNN. There were so many beautiful people along the way.

I have a certain language that I have been developing for this next ride, called Sea to Sea, which we launch on June 4 in Anacortes, Washington. I call it our Road to Recovery. I invite the city mayors and leadership to help celebrate our milestones. And on pit stops along the way, I ask survivors to join us.

Somebody once told me, “That’s a fantastic journey you made, but not everyone is going to have that opportunity.” Which made me think, “What can we do about that?” I had an opportunity to go to the Ellen show because someone I knew bought tickets. And the show we attended was called the 12 days of Christmas. I was blown away to discover that on that show, she was giving away trikes! And also a $500 gift card to Kohl’s and a $250 Visa card. I took those cards and I found the same trike on sale at Kohl’s. I ordered them so they’d come right in time for an event.

22 for 22 is an event to help war veterans. A lot of brain injury survivors are returning from the war and they don’t have solutions to their problems. An average of 22 veterans take their lives every day through suicide as a result of brain injury and PTSD. I gave one of my trikes away at that event to the son of a veteran (and brain injury survivor) who got on my trike and loved it.

I needed to find another trike recipient, so I contacted the BIAAZ (Brain Injury Alliance of Arizona) and asked them to identify another candidate. It was through that contact that I discovered that BIAAZ had resources I didn’t even know existed. They have a 360 gym for disabled people, a return-to-work program, and many more programs and resources for survivors. I would imagine that a lot of survivors don’t even know those resources exist. When I’m in the Facebook groups—and that’s where a lot of survivors are—they’re all talking to each other, but I don’t think they’re familiar with those resources. When I gave those trikes away, the survivors came flooding to my Facebook page. “I want one!” “I want one!” “Where’s my trike?” I was overwhelmed. I felt such a responsibility to make it possible to give trikes to riders.

One of the results of my journey was realizing that I found my voice on my ride. And part of the challenge was also realizing that even though I could cross the country on my trike, I would still need a wheelchair to get through the airport. People don’t understand the challenges I have with organization or short-term memory loss or overstimulation or fatigue, and I recognized that a conversation needed to happen. I knew that I needed to start with that conversation. Dan and I partnered again. He has a nonprofit called Spokes Fighting Strokes, spokesfightingstrokes.org, and my nonprofit is Hope for Trauma, hopefortrauma.org. The vision for Hope for Trauma is to have a national conversation about brain injury and the challenges that survivors have.

I can’t take credit for this work. It really takes a village; it’s not just me. My community was behind me to support me in my very first ride. I needed to gather a bunch of friends to go on my ride. Some of these people didn’t even know me that well. They held fundraisers and opened their homes—families and churches. I knew I could write to these people and they would support me. So I did. And they sent checks. And I used those funds to go on a trip that changed my life.

But again, it’s about teamwork and about people coming together. It’s a miracle when other people do in-kind donations when they hear an inspiring story and they want to help and they want to contribute. They want to contribute a banner or a table or a tablecloth or Internet services—anything. Help along the road, it’s all done by in-kind donations. It’s all done by caring people everywhere.

I don’t think things happen by chance anymore. I believe that was God’s hand. I think that God had a plan for me. Sometimes, you think you’re successful in your own way, and you think you’re living the life you’re supposed to with money and things, but really, you’re kind of in a hamster wheel, just existing.

My father had a true servant-leadership style. That was his legacy, and that’s what I inherited from him, and I want to honor him for that. He left a clear path for me. Serving others is very fulfilling for me, and I know beyond a shadow of a doubt that this is my purpose now. I’ve never known my path this clearly before. This is my most important job.

Staring Down Cancer – Lesley Draper’s Rebirth

Lesley Draper was just going about her everyday life as an escrow officer for a title company when she felt a breast lump while doing her usual self-exam in the shower one day. After going through surgery, chemo and radiation, she appreciates life on a level she never did before. Now, she lives for today and takes much better care of herself because she has seen how fragile life can be.

In 2013, I was in the shower and I felt a lump while doing my breast exam, which I wasn’t good about doing regularly. I felt a lump and I thought it felt weird. I tried to ignore it, but then I thought it was best to get it checked out, so I went to my doc. She thought it just felt like a cyst, which relieved me a little bit, but she set me up for a mammogram to be sure. When nothing showed up on the mammogram, it was an eye-opening experience for me because I learned that about 50% of women have tumors that do not show up because they have very dense breast tissue. Everyone thinks the mammogram is the end-all-be-all of tests, but it’s really not.

Since my doctor knew something was there because she could feel it, she scheduled an MRI, which showed several spots, so I was scheduled for a biopsy. From the biopsy, they determined the spots were cancerous—which really threw me for a loop because it’s really one of those things I just never really thought about. Other people get that, not me. I was on the overweight side, but I felt I was really active and I didn’t eat a lot of junk food, didn’t drink a lot, didn’t smoke, and felt like I was doing all the right things. But, I had to face that I actually had cancer.

Within three weeks after the biopsy, my doctor and I went through all of the options and decided that since there were a couple of tumors that were pretty deep into the tissue, it was obvious we were going to have to remove the breast. I had really large breasts, and I didn’t want to just get rid of one, so I decided to have a full double mastectomy and then have my breasts reconstructed. They also found that the cancer was in one of my lymph nodes, so I also had to go through chemo every three weeks for six or seven sessions.

The chemo was worse than the surgery itself. I didn’t want to eat because everything tasted terrible, so I wouldn’t eat, and I’d lose 10 pounds. Then, I’d finally feel better and start to eat again, which made me gain the 10 back plus five more. So, it was this frustrating back-and-forth game of weight loss and gain, which was hard on me, too. Just when I started feeling normal again, I’d have to go back and do it again. I now have a lot of sympathy for people who have to go through chemo because that was the worst part of the whole experience.

After the chemo, I had to do radiation treatments, which was every day for five weeks. That wasn’t as bad as the surgery and chemo, though. They say that if you go through chemo, radiation is easy, but if you don’t go through chemo, radiation will be much harder. I needed some other surgeries after that for reconstruction, so it wasn’t just smooth sailing after that. It was still a process.

Though it was a difficult process for me, I think it’s even harder on the family and friends who are caring for those with cancer. I gained a deep appreciation and understanding for the caretakers. It’s very hard on them. My significant other at the time and my sister helped with so many things throughout the process. Linda, my ex, helped me sit up and get out of bed after surgery, emptied my breast drains, changed bandages, brought me food and drinks when I didn’t want to eat and kept track of a multitude of meds, just to name a few. Both Lisa and Linda went to every chemo treatment,  all the doctor’s appointments and  provided me with much needed emotional support and so much more. I’m extremely grateful for their support and love. The person going through the cancer is getting all of the attention, and the caretakers—who are working so hard to help their loved ones heal—don’t have that same emotional support, even though they are also going through a huge ordeal.

My friends and family really didn’t want to share with me how scared they were, how concerned. My sister, Lisa, said that the day I had the mastectomy, she walked outside of the hospital and was just screaming and crying outside all by herself and yelling at God. When she was with me, she was always strong and supportive and didn’t show that fear to me. You really find out who the true friends and supporters are in your life. I found some important friends through this process, and it made me appreciate my friends and family so much more.

I have a story that so far, I’ve only told Lisa. When I came out of my mastectomy surgery, and I was in the recovery room and semi-conscious, it looked like fairy dust was floating around me. I remember trying to reach at it. I wondered if I was dreaming it, but it felt real. And right then it hit me: The fairy dust was everyone’s prayers around me. I could feel everyone around me, supporting me, encircling me, and it was such a great feeling. I felt so safe and so protected. I really didn’t feel any fear.

After going through this, I knew I needed to live my life differently. I looked at areas of my life that I could improve on. Doing things differently daily. A lot of it was about alleviating stress in my life. I still have a stressful job, but never again am I going to go back to what I was doing before and working the super long hours. I just told myself that I wouldn’t do that to myself again. Stress was the only factor that I could think of that caused the cancer. I know there are genetic factors, but I didn’t have any history of it in my family. It just came down to stress—working too much, taking on too much, eating crappy because I was tired and overworked. The majority of the time, I tried to eat pretty well, but that didn’t always happen with the hours I was working.

Today, I look at life more positively. Lisa is big into this, too, so she pushes me to be positive. She doesn’t like to allow negativity into her life. I try to alleviate stress, walk my dogs, and relax as much as possible. My daily routines have shifted. Even before I put my feet on the ground in the morning, I say, “Thank you God for this day.” And my days are filled with the “I ams.” “I am strong.” “I am courageous.” “I am healthy.” I even say my mantras on my way to the bathroom at work, and I constantly look for new ones to say to myself. That’s really helping me.

I also look at other aspects of my life that I can improve on, not just exercise. I’m working on eliminating sugar and I don’t eat meat. I’m more consistent with walking and being healthy. I take vitamin D and vitamin E because that really helps my bones. But, I’m not obsessive about taking or doing any one thing. I just try to keep balance in my life now.

I noticed I was really starting to beat myself up, telling myself I was weak and I should be this or that. But, I’m still building my strength. The surgeries took a lot out of me. I still have a lot of numbness, and everything feels strange. Even just exercising feels strange. It’s like starting over with everything, and I have to not beat myself because I’m not able to do certain things and I’m not as strong as I was. Now, I just don’t go there. So what if I can’t do it perfectly? Just start and go slowly. And that’s hard when you’re a competitive person like I am. I felt I needed to keep up. I liked being the older person in the workout class who was keeping up with the younger kids. That always felt good. But now, I just have to accept that I really am the older person! It’s just a matter of getting over what people think of me. That’s a huge part of it. Just do what you can do. Be who you are. Don’t compare yourself to other people. Gradually, I just started to feel better about everything through this process.

I don’t feel like I’ve done anything really special. I see all the women who go through this all of the time, and I feel I just had to get through it and do what I had to do. I don’t feel like it was anything great. But, my sister told me it really was a huge thing I went through. Growing up, she used to tell me I was a wimp and make fun of me (teasingly) because even brushing my hair would hurt. But when I went through this, she told me that even though she used to make fun of me, she thinks I’m the strongest person she knows. That blew my mind. I don’t necessarily think that about myself, but hearing her say that really makes me appreciate what I’ve been through. Maybe I really am stronger than I think I am.

Just recently, I had yet another PET scan. It was clear, so I’m now three years out—from stage three cancer to cancer free!

Changing Course – How Pepique Stout Cleaned Up His Act

Pepique Stout embodies the typical American male. He ate mostly fast food and a lot of meat, drank too much, smoked pot and cigarettes, and his life and health were spiraling out of control. Then, one day, he decided to quit drinking and smoking, and that led to a path of eliminating all “crap” and becoming a vegan. Now, he’s healthier and happier than he’s ever been, and he has the blood tests to prove it.

My story of how I changed my life began with drinking. The first major health change I made was five years ago. I quit drinking, smoking pot and cigarettes all on the same day. That was intense. I went through intense biological changes after that. It proved to be too much to handle all at once, and I fell into a depression. I went to a Western medicine doctor who put me on antidepressants, which I stayed on for about six to seven months. As I progressed through AA and really started to find myself and find my spiritual strength and become more aware of what was important to me, I realized I didn’t need the antidepressants anymore. And furthermore, they scared me. The side effects caused me to get cravings that made me want to up my dosage. And I was getting brain zaps in my eyes every time I moved my eyes. So, I stopped the drug. I wanted it out of my body. At that point, I was freaked out by anything foreign in my body, and I took a very firm stance to not do anything like that at all. When I was going through my first divorce, I went back to smoking cigarettes, which was after about six months of not smoking, and that lasted for about six months. I quit cigarettes again on the same day I quit alcohol a year earlier. So now, my alcohol quit date and cigarette quit date are exactly one year apart on the same day. I now have four years without cigarettes and five without alcohol.

I was also eating a lot of fast food back then. I was driving a truck for my job and eating badly. I was a carnivore of the highest sort. I never really anticipated making any changes in that area. I didn’t feel I needed to make any dietary changes. I just accepted all the health risks of eating that way. It was just the way I was. After pushing forward with this clean quest (no drugs, alcohol or smoking), I started watching documentaries here and there, and gaining knowledge about the health industry and started taking a little better care of myself. But really, I didn’t change a whole lot as far as diet and exercise. I had a physical job, so I just put effort into that.

Somewhere along the way, before I met my second wife, I started smoking pot again. And since I’m an addict by nature (and I accept that about myself), I can’t do these things in moderation. I eventually become self-destructive. So, I decided to be totally sober all the time after my wife and I got married. Then, we decided to have a child, but we ran into infertility issues that were rooted in endometriosis. Through surgeries and miscarriages, it ultimately led us to find that there was no cure for our problem other than a dietary cure, which led us to investigate a vegan diet—no sugar, gluten or soy. That lifestyle was going to prove to be really difficult because a lot of the known vegan products on the market are soy based.

 

We were faced with a dilemma; does my wife cook three meals, for my wife, her daughter, and me, or do we all change and adopt a vegan diet? Prior to these changes, I had already decided to quit fast food. That was probably one of the more impactful changes that I made. I didn’t really feel that sluggish when the meat was from a good source, but I did feel bad when I ate fast food. But even eating meat from a good source, I still felt like I just wanted to take a nap or sit around and not do anything. It was kind of like a food coma. Once we took meat out of our diet and went headlong into the vegan diet, we did a lot of research to motivate us because her daughter and I didn’t want to make the change at first. We were just doing it for my wife. But then, the guilt factor kicked in because she was cooking the majority of our meals. I didn’t want to ask her to cook meat for us when she couldn’t eat it, so we made the decision as a family to go vegan. As it progressed, we really started to enjoy it and we began to educate ourselves. We’d watch food movies as a family, Forks Over Knives, Food, Inc., Farmageddon, and more. There is a wealth of knowledge on how to eat vegan, and it’s easily accessible these days. The Beautiful Truth was the most impactful of all the movies we watched. It’s amazing to see how deceived we’ve been by the FDA and the cancer drug societies and the like. Everything we need is already here. We don’t need to process it. It grows in the ground. Just go and find it. It’s a basic thing that we’ve all forgotten. We’ve been so deceived by the lies of the dairy industries and the meat industries that are trying to just make money, but they’re no better than the cigarette industry. They’re lying to us and telling us these things are necessary.

The vegetarian food industry is stuck on soy as the easy way to get protein. There’s a common misconception that you need some sort of protein source like processed soy or meat product to be healthy, which is just absolutely not true. There is more absorbable protein in some vegetables than there is in some steaks. Yes, granted, the meat products contain more protein when they’re sitting on your plate than the broccoli does, but when it goes through your body and you digest it, what come into your body and what goes out as waste, you will wind up with more absorbable protein from some of the vegetables than you ever will from eating meat. That’s the thing that the meat industry doesn’t tell you. They aren’t lying; you just aren’t absorbing much of the protein. When I eat a full plate of broccoli and kale and all these other intensely deep-green vegetables, the amount of nutrient that my body absorbs is above and beyond anything else I can get from dairy or meat or processed soy.

In addition to eating a vegan diet, supplements are a big deal to me. I eat a full breakfast and then I take supplements with a vegan shake. I have to make the exception when I eat out that I won’t always find non-GMO, but I do insist on organic whenever possible and vegan. Animal rights were not what drove me to become vegan. It’s the health factor. I tried it, I put it in my body, and I feel the difference, and that’s my marker…how I feel. I’m a big advocate of spices, too. They are therapy in your food, too. Turmeric and cayenne pepper I put into just about everything. There are a ton of good spices. Most of the Indian spices are really powerful. The spices themselves are almost more healthy than the food they’re on. And that’s also really overlooked by Americans. We’re a salt and pepper society. I’ve been exploring the culinary aspect of creating something that is not only delicious but also nourishes my body, and when I’m done eating it, I feel great.

I went to the doctor recently, thinking there was something wrong with me. It turned out that it was my recent second divorce that was causing my anxiety. The doctor ran all kinds of tests: heart, blood, lung x-rays—everything—trying to figure out what was wrong with me. Turns out, I’m the epitome of health! I didn’t have any deficiencies. Again, my diet was all I need to be healthy. Vitamin B12 and iron, which are common deficiencies in under-educated vegans, were perfect. When I first went into the doctor for the antidepressant, I was anemic and the doc put me on an iron supplement. And that’s when I was eating meat almost exclusively. So, that was an aha moment for me. Now, as a vegan, I have more iron absorption and I’m not anemic. I also do a lot of probiotics and supplementing to fill in the gaps, definitely, but they are all organic, seed-based for protein, and none of it is soy based. That’s what I find works best with my body. Western medicine, and my tests, proved that it’s working for me. Hydration is also a huge factor. I carry around a water bottle at all times.

This is a full-body growth experience that has led me to feeling healthy and stable and not depressed. All of that depression and anxiety was because I had too many of the things that shouldn’t be in my body and not enough of the things that should be there. By cleansing my body of all foreign crap and poisons (as I refer to alcohol and tobacco now) and sugar, I’m happier and healthier than I’ve ever been before.

Tara Marlow’s Story – Life is Short. Make It Matter!

Tara Marlow is the travel blogger behind the site Travel Far Enough, where she and her husband inspire others to quit their corporate cubicles and live the lives they dream of. But her own life and dreams weren’t always aligned: until 2011, Tara worked 70-hour weeks and envied those whose lives revolved around traveling and writing about it. A road trip with her preteen daughter brought Tara’s priorities into focus, challenged her to drastically reorient her life around them, and compelled her to live her dreams. 

I grew up in Australia and took my first overseas trip as an 18-year-old. I was immediately bitten by the travel bug! At age 22, I moved to America, where my former husband and I thought we’d stay five years before moving on. The marriage didn’t stick, unlike the travel bug, but a beautiful daughter came from that marriage.

Five years turned into 20; I met my wonderful husband Rich and built a career in Texas. Before I realized it, I was drinking the Kool-Aid of corporate America and found myself working 70 hours a week. I got up each day to rush out the door, work at a frenetic pace, and come home only to work more while throwing dinner together before sitting down in front of the TV to work on my laptop. I had migraines a few times a month from the weight of it all.

Work was costing me my health and my relationships with family and friends. However, I stuck to my promise to my daughter that we would take a mother-daughter trip every year. In 2010, I knew I needed to get away from the craziness for a while and that our annual girly getaway would slip through my fingers if I didn’t make a plan. So, I asked her if she wanted to take a road trip. Without any hesitation, she said, “Let’s go to Mount Rushmore.”

I laughed because Mount Rushmore had never been on my list! But she’d learned about it in school. I thought, “Why not?” We agreed that we’d make it an epic two-week road trip and visit some other cool places along the way. We researched the stops to make, created road-trip playlists, downloaded audiobooks, found a questionnaire we could talk through, and came up with a mantra: “Try something new every day.” Little did I know that this wouldn’t just become a fun road trip; it would change my life.

My daughter and I reconnected as we traveled. Our reconnection on the road made me realize that I was missing out on her life when we were at home. I wondered what I had missed over the years of 70-hour weeks.

A year later, both my father and Rich’s father passed away. Around the same time, my daughter came to me while I was working and asked if she could talk to me for a few minutes. I replied, “Yes, but give me five minutes.” Three hours later, I finally went to her bedroom to find her sobbing on her bed. She said, “Mum, you said five minutes. It’s been three hours.” This was not a proud parental moment.

That was the absolute turning point for me. It was time to listen to what was happening in my life. I talked with my husband, and he said, “You know, yes. You are spiraling. You’re not in a good place. You should consider what else you can do.”

In mid-2011, I got my ducks in a row at work and gave notice. I rediscovered my passions for travel, writing, and photography and researched them like crazy. For the next year, I took online courses and sold my photography at local markets. Life was good. I could breathe again.

In 2012, our life changed again. My husband had his own “aha” moment after watching my transformation and decided to join my quest. After a family discussion, we decided to move to Australia. Even with the stress of an overseas move, my migraines stopped.

For our family of three, moving to Australia was the right decision. Now, I can spend three hours deliberating John Donne poetry with my daughter, take hikes with my family, and go camping or explore epic snorkeling spots in the middle of the week. And when my daughter graduates, Rich and I will be traveling full time. Life is open to us now.

We have a daily routine focused on family, health, and following our bliss. Over coffee and our daily vitamin D each morning, we plan our day. It may be writing, working on marketing, or exploring a new spot. When my daughter returns from school, we talk about her day at length. We make healthy meals together with the abundance that Australia’s farmers’ markets have to offer. Our evenings are like most families’, with a key difference: we ditched the TV when we left America. We love it. Life is healthier for us in every way.

I’ve thought about what drives me to make each day better than the last, and it’s simple. It’s what we talk about on our website: Life is short. Make your life matter.

Kay Stephens’ Story – Embracing Each Day

International model and businesswoman Kay Stephens’ life changed drastically in an instant one windy New York day in 2003. As she walked to class, gale-force winds hurled a 60-pound pole from a poorly secured construction zone fence into the left side of her head. She saw the wind knock down the construction materials like dominos as she blacked out. Her life has never been the same, but Kay hasn’t let her immense challenges get her down. Instead, she embraces each day as a fresh start and is empowering other brain injury survivors through her Faces of TBI campaign. 

Before my brain injury, I found success and fulfillment in many ways. Not only was I an international fashion model with work in my home country of Jamaica and in London, but I also had done public relations for public, private, and governmental entities, had run a grooming and modeling school in Jamaica, and published a book that sold 20,000 copies in the Caribbean. My wonderful daughter had just started high school in New York, where I was attending Queens College.

My concussion happened as I went to class one day. Right as I was feeling thankful that I’d made it to class in one piece, a metal pole from a makeshift construction fence struck the side of my head. My neck went one way as my body went the other. In the emergency room, doctors told me I had short-term memory deficits from the concussion that would remedy themselves within a few weeks. They said I was fine otherwise and did not do an MRI or CT scan. But the truth was that I had suffered many injuries, including herniated and bulging discs in my cervical spine, a torn rotator cuff and tendons, hip and right shoulder bursitis, pelvic injuries, and more. Some of these would not be discovered until years later.

The problems I experienced after that did not make sense to me, and I hid them for a long time, thinking I was going crazy. I couldn’t smell for three years. I had problems with my vision, hearing, and urinary systems. I could look, but I couldn’t interpret what I saw or read the words on the page in front of me. Sounds that are in the background for most people, like a clock ticking or a refrigerator humming, were suddenly loud and overwhelming for me because I couldn’t filter them out. I had terrible neck spasms and blinding headaches.

The true nature of my injuries was not uncovered until 2008, when I finally took control of finding out what had happened to me. I underwent neuropsychological testing, which revealed a “mild” traumatic brain injury, or TBI, which caused short-term memory and attention deficits and emotional deregulation. Parts of my brain had very low oxygen flow. I had to focus on each injury one at a time, and to date, I’ve had more than 1,300 appointments stemming from this one accident. My brain injury may be categorized as mild, but its impact on my life has been immense.

Life as I knew it stopped that day in 2003. My type A personality had to retire early, and surviving my TBI became my primary focus. I underwent so much treatment that I experienced secondary health issues; medications that helped me with aspects of my injury caused gastritis so bad that I wanted to die as I lay in the hospital. Help came in the form of a homeopathic nutritionist who gave me some critical advice: “Let your food be your medicine and your medicine be your food.” I cured my gastritis through an intestinal cleanse, dietary restrictions, and a commitment to the right foods. Combining this with my routine physical therapy and other treatments has allowed me to return to some of my old activities and manage my emotions.

I strengthen and center myself every day through quiet time and prayer. This time connects me with my inner strength and my spiritual sense of a higher purpose. Music is therapy for me, and I connect socially in small group settings with the people who have rallied around me. These things have helped me make my dream for the Faces of TBI campaign a reality. This campaign will raise public awareness of the invisible disability of brain injury to increase understanding, tolerance, funding, and emotional support for those with brain injuries.

I encourage others with brain injuries to accept yourselves. I couldn’t have gotten here without finding the courage to accept my new, disabled self and making changes to support my own success. Find someone to share your feelings with who is objective, while also building your support network of friends and family who accept you the way you are. Envision your new goals, renew your love for yourself, and do what brings you joy! Like me, you can choose to make each day a fresh start.

GMOs: What’s the debate about?

Genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, are living organisms in which the DNA has been altered with the genetic material of another species. Most GMOs are plants that have been modified to withstand the application of herbicides; the weeds die and the farmers’ crops survive. In one odd instance, to study human-genetic disorders, Chinese geneticists took the bioluminescence DNA from jellyfish and inserted it into the genes of pig embryos, creating piglets that glow in the dark when put under a black light.

So, why, if GMOs offer benefits to farmers and medical studies, are more and more consumers becoming alarmed? Because today, more than 90% of all soy and corn sold in the United States has been genetically modified, along with sugar beets and canola oil. Not only are these commodity crops our staples, but they’re also common ingredients in many processed foods. In fact, 80% of the food in the U.S. contains some GMOs, and while Big Food, chemical companies, many biotech scientists and world organizations insist GMOs are safe, critics claim genetically modified foods raise serious health concerns.

According to the American Academy of Environmental Medicine, “several animal studies indicate serious health risks associated with GM food consumption including infertility, immune dysregulation, accelerated aging, dysregulation of genes associated with cholesterol synthesis, insulin regulation, cell signaling, and protein formation, and changes in the liver, kidney, spleen and gastrointestinal system.”

And, although some attempts at genetic engineering have been done to increase nutritional value, The Institute for Responsible Technology states that the two most engineered traits are “herbicide tolerance and the ability of the plant to produce its own pesticide. These results have no health benefit, only economic benefit.”

Even worse, not only have GMO crops become tolerant to herbicides, so have weeds, creating “super-weeds” which require even heavier applications of most toxic chemicals such as glyphosate, commonly known as Roundup. Scientific American recently reported that the World Health Organization declared “glyphosate a probable carcinogen.”

Unfortunately for Americans, the United States has the loosest restrictions worldwide. According to the United States Library of Congress, “Compared to other countries, regulation of GMOs in the U.S. is relatively favorable to their development…the U.S. is the world’s leading producer of genetically modified (GM) crops.”

Currently the debate has moved into the spotlight on the political stage. Since the federal government won’t pass more stringent laws regarding GMO use, states have taken matters into their own hands. In 2014, Governor Pete Shumlin of Vermont passed one of the nation’s first mandatory labeling laws for GMOs, which requires all foods that are genetically modified or have genetically modified ingredients to be labeled as such. The law goes into effect on July 1, 2016, and legislation currently in Congress and backed by the Big Food lobby is trying to stop the law from taking effect, arguing that state-by-state labeling requirements would make it challenging for the food industry to comply.

Many consumers nowadays want to be informed about the GMOs in their foods. Until laws mandate that the food industry tells us which foods contain GMOs, we can only rely on those responsible companies that can assure us no GMOs have been used. Look for the label “non-GMO” or “no GMOs” to be sure.

 

Sources:

http://www.wsj.com/articles/vermont-invades-your-kitchen-1457308283

http://responsibletechnology.org/gmo-education/

http://responsibletechnology.org/gmo-education/health-risks/

http://www.aaemonline.org/gmo.php

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2015/11/vermont-lawsuit-a-test-case-for-gmo-labeling-laws-and-the-first-amendment

http://blogs.usda.gov/2013/05/17/organic-101-can-gmos-be-used-in-organic-products/

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/truth-about-gmos

http://www.nongmoproject.org/learn-more/

http://www.livescience.com/40895-gmo-facts.html

Scientists Create Glow-in-the-Dark Pigs Just in Time for Your Next Rave

http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-gmo-food-labeling-0313-biz-20160311-story.html

Rochelle’s Battle with Celiac Disease

Rochelle Asmussen led a normal life until celiac disease turned her world upside down. With healing came weight gain and a frustration that she was stuck in a rut. She discovered the way to a better, fitter, happier life through a personal trainer and daily rituals.

I was diagnosed with celiac disease about 17 years ago. I was so sick and so uncomfortable, but it was a blessing to find out it was just a food allergy and not something worse. For a long time, we were thinking that I was really sick. The doctors didn’t know what was going on. They had no clue. These days, celiac is so mainstream. The food was awful back then for anyone with a gluten allergy. Now, it’s great. I don’t even think about it anymore.

I’ve always been fit, but since getting celiac and becoming very thin from being so sick, my metabolism just completely changed and I gained all the weight after my body healed from the damage. It isn’t fair. I finally got my body fixed and felt better and then the weight came on and my metabolism got all messed up. So, ever since then, I’ve been struggling with my weight and trying to get it down. Then, I turned 50 and my hormones went crazy with menopause, stress, job, children, a teenager and a college kid, bills, and anxiety. I knew I needed a change.

At a scrapbooking convention, my friend, Shelly, was casually saying that she had just gotten her training certificate in personal. She was wondering how to find a job, whether she should go with a gym, etc. I told her she should think about training people in their homes. I can speak from experience, I don’t like going to gyms because I’m embarrassed. I’m heavier than anyone else there and I wonder if people are judging me, so I told her I would love it if someone came to my home. We began working out together a month later. I told Shelly I didn’t know if I could do it, or if I’d be good at it, but I wanted to do it. It’s a very vulnerable feeling. You’re getting down to your nakedness, almost, and then you’re exercising and grunting and groaning in front of someone else.

I had to start with measurements and weight, and that was the hardest part. That’s where I had to face everything, and now someone else knows too. It’s now out there. We started really slow, and I loved her style; she was very easy on me. I couldn’t do much to begin with.

Shelly took notes and pictures to when we started and as we go along. She ups the ante as I get stronger and has created exercises that are harder and harder. When we first started, I could barely get up off the floor. It was really hard. I had to use a chair or other things to help me up. Now, fast-forward a year later and I can jump right up, and I don’t even need to use my hands. I can do full burpees. I used to just move slowly from one foot to the next, and now I can jump through them properly. My squats are also amazing. Shelly put me against the wall and just had me hold the sit position. I said, “This is all you got? I can do this another two minutes!” I was doing shoulder raises at the same time and I could do that all day, too. My biceps are stronger, as well. I feel completely different. My balance is even better than before. She’s always got me on a balance ball or something. My core is stronger. Everything feels different. I feel so good. Weight-bearing exercise at my age is so important.

I also have a competitive husband, and we now have FitBits—and so does Shelly. We’re all friends on the FitBit program, so we challenge each other constantly. We can see each other’s seven-day cumulative steps, and we are always competing against each other. When I see that one of them has more steps, I think, “Oh, my gosh, I only have 8,000 steps. I’ve got to go for another walk!” Even though I’ve already done my hour workout and already been all over the house and up and down the stairs, I then go for that extra walk. I’ve got to! I’ll take the dog one more time. The dog helps; she will go for a walk whenever I want and however many times I want.

This has completely changed my thinking. I’m always thinking about what active thing I can do next and I don’t mind running up and down stairs anymore. I need my steps and I need to beat my husband! It’s been so good for both of us. He got his FitBit a year before I got mine. He bought mine for me for Christmas last year. When I got mine, his life also changed for the better. Because he’s super competitive, he’s been getting about 20,000 steps a day. We call him the nightwalker. He goes downstairs and walks on the treadmill at midnight.

Before, I didn’t like exercise; I did it because I had to. Now, I really look forward to it, and I love that Shelly is coming over. I get up early every morning, and I think, “Yay! I’m going to work out today!” She’s making me a better person all around. I’m taking my vitamins now because she has suggested it. My husband can tell me all day long that I really should take my vitamins, but if Shelly tells me, I’ll do it.

My goal for my weight loss right now is two pounds a week. By spring break, I want to feel better when my family goes to Mexico. That’s my new goal. I have to cut out all the wine and bad stuff. So far, I’ve been building a lot of muscle, so my weight hasn’t changed as much as I would like, but things are fitting better and I feel better. I just have to stop drinking my calories in wine.

I’ve never had a goal before. I always know what the end result is, but I haven’t made the little goals. Two pounds a week doesn’t sound like much, but it adds up quickly. Two pounds is pretty easy.

Thankfully, I have a kid to get off to school, so I have great morning rituals. I’m not supposed to work out on an empty stomach or with too much food, so I have a little bit and then warm up with 2,000 steps on the elliptical even before Shelly gets there. I also do “I am” affirmations all the time, too, and I start my day by meditating for 20 minutes.

I work out every day now, and I feel so good. I used to be sluggish and tired. Now, I have much more energy and I look forward to working out. My skin looks better. I’ve been drinking more water, sleeping better. I still have anxiety at night, but it’s getting better. Working out helps the anxiety a lot. Even just fresh air helps.

We’re realtors, so we have a lot of stress and anxiety. Getting out there and getting that breath of fresh air because you’re trying to get your steps is so uplifting. I can leave in a huff and angry, and by the time I’m halfway around the first block, I’m thinking, “This is great! Why was mad? I don’t even remember.” I can’t even yell at my husband if he makes me mad because I’ve forgotten why I was mad.

I used to listen to positive books when driving to see my mom as she was dying, before I started working out with Shelly. That was the beginning of this new transformation. I am committed to this—it’s been a year and I’m still committed to it. This has shifted my thinking into healthier choices. Exercise and taking care of myself will be something I do for the rest of my life now. I love it.

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